The Lost Vintage by Ann Mah: “This story was born from wild scribblings” at AR Lenoble during the 2015 Champagne harvest

ANN MAH is a food and travel writer based in Paris and Washington DC. She is the author of the food memoir Mastering the Art of French Eating, and a novel, Kitchen Chinese. She regularly contributes to the New York Times’ Travel section and she has written for Condé Nast Traveler, Vogue.com, BonAppetit.com, Washingtonian magazine, and other media outlets. THE LOST VINTAGE, her latest novel, was published by William Morrow on June 19, 2018. It’s an engrossing novel about family, history, and wine set against a beautifully rendered and evocative ancestral Burgundy vineyard. **

** A Conversation with Ann Mah, author of The Lost Vintage **

You were inspired to write The Lost Vintage after volunteering for the wine harvest in France, which you documented in a travel piece for the New York Times. When did you know you wanted to write this novel?

I first visited Burgundy in 2010 to research an article on Thomas Jefferson’s favorite vineyards in France. The minute I set foot in the region, I was captivated by the vine-covered slopes and charming villages. And if I sensed ghosts there, hovering amid the beauty, they only added to my fascination. I think the seed for this novel was planted then. A few years later, I volunteered to pick grapes at the harvest in Champagne at AR Lenoble. Harvest volunteers are often given free room and board, and I was put up in an empty attic apartment at the vineyard house. The rooms hadn’t been touched since the 1960s: they were sparsely decorated with mid-century hospital furniture; the floors creaked; the wallpaper was peeling; and at night the rural silence was deafening – and bone-chilling. Even though I was exhausted from long days of physical labor, whenever I lay down to sleep, my imagination would cartwheel. And so, I slept with the lights on, and when I woke, I wrote in my journal. This story was born from those wild scribblings.

Kate, the protagonist in The Lost Vintage, is a wine expert and is studying for the prestigious Master of Wine exam. What is your own history with wine? Do you consider yourself an expert?

It was important to me to be able to write accurately about the wine world, so as part of the research for this book, I took classes through the Wine and Spirits Education Trust, which is the same organization that administers the Master of Wine program. I learned just enough to know I’m definitely not an expert! As part of the class we did blind tastings, in which we smelled and tasted different wines and identified flavors from the wine aroma wheel. People would call out things like “dill,” “petrol,” or “green peppers,” and everyone would argue until the teacher came down with the final verdict. My fellow classmates were really competitive. I used to joke that it was like a blood sport.

As a food and travel writer, of course, you’re always weaving narrative into evocative sensory descriptions of what you’re tasting or seeing, and that skill is apparent in The Lost Vintage, as well. How did you find writing about food and wine different in fiction, if at all?

When I’m writing an article, I’m trying to accurately relate an experience. But for fiction, I can’t imagine two better metaphors than food and wine – they speak to our deepest desires (or disgusts), our most visceral memories. You can communicate so much through a character’s favorite foods. As well, the dinner table remains my absolute favorite setting to write a scene of family conflict – everyone is tidily in one place, but each person has their own motivations and distractions.

Much of your book deals with history, in particular that of World War II in Europe, and how people reconcile their family legacy with their own values. What prompted you to challenge your characters in this way?

As I mentioned, I was captivated by the beauty of Burgundy – but I felt something ominous there, too. I didn’t really understand it until I started researching World War II and learned more about the “épuration sauvage,” the spontaneous “wild purge” that punished thousands of women throughout France in the days and weeks following the Liberation. Accused of “horizontal collaboration,” or sleeping with the enemy, these women were targeted by vigilante justice and publicly humiliated. Their heads were shaved, they were stripped, paraded through town, smeared with tar, stoned, kicked, beaten, and sometimes killed. Yes, some of them had slept with Germans. Some of them were prostitutes. But some had been raped. Some were women who merely worked for German soldiers, as was the case with one cleaning lady. Some were framed and falsely accused out of jealousy. Many were mothers desperate to feed their starving children. In almost every case, their punishment was far worse than their male counterparts. These women – over 20,000 of them! – were the most vulnerable members of society, and they became scapegoats for a humiliated nation. I felt it was important for their story to finally be told.

The Lost Vintage shows that though there were many French résistants acting during the war, there were also many French people who essentially supported the Nazis through complicity, often for survival’s sake. As Rose says at one point, “It’s much safer to do nothing.” Do you think these actions are wartime phenomena, or are there ways in which we can show courage or remain complicit in a similar way in day to day life?

I think World War II is ultimately a morality tale and so many years after it, we’d all like to believe we’d have fought for the right side. Of course, the reality is always more complicated – and wartime complicates things even further. I think a lot of regret and shame about the war still lingers in France. If I learned anything while researching this book, it’s that small actions can have unforeseen and lingering consequences.

** Overview of The Lost Vintage **

To become one of only a few hundred certified wine experts in the world, Kate must pass the notoriously difficult Master of Wine examination. She’s failed twice before; her third attempt will be her last chance. When she suddenly finds herself without a job and with the test a few months away, she travels to Burgundy to spend the fall at the vineyard estate that has belonged to her family for generations. There she can bolster her shaky knowledge of Burgundian vintages and reconnect with her cousin Nico and his wife, Heather, who now oversee day-to-day management of the grapes. The one person Kate hopes to avoid is Jean-Luc, a talented young winemaker and her first love.

At the vineyard house, Kate is happy to help her cousin clean out the enormous basement that is filled with generations of discarded and forgotten belongings. Deep inside the cellar, behind a large armoire, she discovers a hidden room containing a cot, some Resistance pamphlets, and an enormous cache of valuable wine. Piqued by the secret space, Kate begins to dig into her family’s history—a search that takes her back to the dark days of World War II and introduces her to a relative she never knew existed, a great–half aunt who was a teenager during the Nazi occupation.

As she learns more about her family, the line between resistance and collaboration blurs, driving Kate to find the answers to two crucial questions: who, exactly, did her family aid during the difficult years of the war? And what happened to six valuable bottles of wine that seem to be missing from the cellar’s collection?

** Reviews for The Lost Vintage **

“Mah’s detailed descriptions of life on a family vineyard, how wine is produced, and how subtle differences in taste are discerned are so robust that a novice wine drinker may progress to aficionado status by the end… Engaging…Will delight Francophiles and readers who enjoy historical fiction with a twist by such authors as Lauren Willig or Christina Baker Kline.” — Library Journal (starred)

“Charismatic. … Resonates on many levels, and [Mah’s] engaging story will appeal to readers who enjoy the family sagas of Kate Morton and Kristin Hannah.”— Booklist

“If you enjoyed my Sarah’s Key and Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale, then this wonderful book by Ann Mah is for you. I read it in one greedy gobble, couldn’t put it down, and can’t recommend it enough.” — Tatiana de Rosnay, bestselling author of Sarah’s Key

“A sensual and heartbreaking story of family secrets, lost love, and retribution that unfolds in the magical vineyards of Burgundy. Utterly gripping. I couldn’t put it down.” — Danielle Trussoni, New York Times and internationally bestselling author of Angelology

“In elegant prose, Ann Mah spreads before her readers a sumptuous feast—a gripping mystery, a heartfelt love story, and a fascinating historical account. Awash in beautifully rendered detail, The Lost Vintage effortlessly glides between the vineyards of modern day Burgundy and the terrors of Nazi-occupied France. Graceful and compelling.” — Cathy Marie Buchanan, New York Times bestselling author of The Painted Girls

“Suspenseful, rich in detail about French food, culture, history and of course wine, the real power of The Lost Vintage lies in its thoughtful and humane rendering of difficult but important truths.” —Therese Anne Fowler, New York Times bestselling author of Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgeral

fr_FRFR
fr_FRFR en_GBEN es_ESES de_DEDE it_ITIT zh_CNZH jaJA

Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs 1996

Le vin :

Champagne issu du cépage Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru de la Côte des Blancs, vendange 1996.

La dégustation :

Ce millésime a l’incroyable équilibre acidité – sucre révèle avec le temps un potentiel de garde rare. En magnum, il garde une jeunesse étonnante et une fraicheur remarquable. Le nez est très expressif avec des notes de miel, de noix et d’abricots secs. Des notes de fruits blancs se détachent et apportent beaucoup de délicatesse à ce grand vin. La bouche est ample, longue, précise sur la finale.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne accompagnera idéalement une volaille à la farce à base de fruits secs et pistaches, il sublimera une simple purée de pomme de terres crémée aux éclats de noisette et d’amandes. Il rayonnera sur des pâtes cuites très affinées mais aussi sur un brie aux truffes.

Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs 1979

Le vin :

Champagne issu du cépage Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru de la Côte des Blancs, vendange 1979.

La dégustation :

La robe est dorée, la bulle délicate et très intégrée. Le nez explose de fruits jaunes et fruits secs, noix, amandes. La bouche est ample, puissante, longue mais d’une incroyable fraicheur. Ce vin dégage encore une superbe énergie signe d’un grand potentiel de garde.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne sera à privilégier sur des mets comme un risotto speck, ricotta et parmesan, un agneau en tajine aux fruits secs, un canard figues et épices. Le mariage sera parfait sur un beaufort très affiné ou un comté 24 mois.

Intense "mag 14" dégorgement tardif

Le vin :

Champagne issu d’un assemblage des cépages Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru, Pinot Noir de Bisseuil Premier Cru et de Pinot Meunier de Damery.
Ce Champagne est aussi un assemblage d’années expliqué par la mention « mag » suivi d’un chiffre. Le chiffre 14 correspond à l’année de récolte (2014) servant de base à l’assemblage. Le « mag » signifie qu’une partie des vins de réserve ont été élevés en magnum, apportant précision et fraîcheur à cette cuvée.
Cette édition « mag 14 » est la toute première de la série des « mag » mise sur le marché depuis 2018.

La dégustation :

Le nez est très riche avec des notes de fruits jaunes. La bouche est très expressive tout en restant délicate avec une bulle très intégrée et une texture de mousse très onctueuse. La finale est longue, puissante et fraiche.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 10°C à 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

La vinosité et la belle longueur en bouche de ce Champagne permettent de nombreux accords avec une préférence pour une volaille fermière grillée, peau très croustillante ou un comté 36 mois.

Les Aventures Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs

Le vin :

Champagne parcellaire issu du lieu-dit Les Aventures à Chouilly Grand Cru de la Côte des Blancs et élaboré à partir de grandes années sélectionnées pour leur complémentarité.

La dégustation :

Le nez est d’une rare densité. Le temps long sur lies laisse apparaître des notes d’une noble oxydation mais aussi dotée d’une grande texture. La persistance en bouche est longue, puissante mais aérienne sur la finale.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 12°C à 13°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Il sublimera une viande blanche sauce légèrement crémée et agrumes. Il se mariera idéalement sur un homard grillé ou un risotto aux coquillages. Un fromage comme le chaource ou l’abondance fera également un bel accord.

La cuvée Gentilhomme 2013 Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs

Le vin :

Champagne issu du cépage Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru de la Côte des Blancs, vendange 2013.

La dégustation :

Le nez est riche de fruits secs, grillés et notes de fruits blancs. La bouche est ample avec des arômes agrumes et une finale précise et longue.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 12°C à 13°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne sera parfait à l’apéritif à l’automne ou en hiver. Il accompagnera une belle volaille de Bresse mais aussi des fromages tels qu’un Comté affiné 24 mois ou un vieux parmesan.

Rosé Terroirs "mag 14"

Le vin :

Champagne issu d’un assemblage de Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru pour 90 % et de vin rouge de Pinot Noir de Bisseuil Premier Cru pour 10%. Ce Champagne est aussi un assemblage d’années exprimé par le « mag 14». "14" correspond à l’année de récolte servant de base à l’assemblage, ici 2014. La mention « mag » signifie qu’une partie des vins de réserve ont été élevés en magnum, apportant précision et fraîcheur à cette cuvée.

La dégustation :

Le nez est aérien avec des notes de fruits rouges et agrumes. La bouche est gourmande et élégante. La finale est fraiche, délicate sur les arômes de fruits rouges croquants. On y retrouve la finesse du Chardonnay Grand Cru et l'ampleur délicate des Pinots Noirs 1er Cru.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 10°C à 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne sublimera une volaille aux épices telles que le safran ou le cumin pour relever les arômes de fruits, des jambons crus piment d’Espelette, un Langres ou encore un dessert désucré comme une panna cotta vanille, noisettes et amandes.

Premier Cru Blanc de Noirs 2013

Le vin :

Champagne issu du cépage Pinot Noir de Bisseuil Premier Cru de la Montagne de Reims, vendange 2013.

La dégustation :

Le nez est riche de fruits secs et de fruits jaunes avec quelques notes grillées. La bouche est ample, fruitée passant des fruits rouges aux fruits secs avec une pointe fumée subtile. La finale est longue, précise, tendue et saline pour mettre en appétit.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 12°C à 13°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne accompagnera idéalement toutes les entrées ou plats à base de viandes blanches comme une belle côte de veau ou un simple pâté croute au porc. L’accord sera très juste sur des plats plus élaborés tels le pigeonneau et poêlée de champignons ou un ris de veau aux câpres.

Grand Cru Blanc de Blancs 2012

Le vin :

Champagne issu du cépage Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru de la Côte des Blancs, vendange 2012.

La dégustation :

Le nez est délicat mais très riche avec un mélange d’arômes floraux et de fruits blancs. La bouche est tout en retenue, droite et concentrée avec une finale franche laissant présager un très grand potentiel de garde. 
Température de dégustation conseillée : 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne conviendra à une grande palette de mets des plus simples aux plus raffinés. Il sera parfait à l’apéritif accompagné de gougères ou sur des mets japonais tels que des sashimis. La belle tenue et l’acidité du vin peuvent vous laisser oser une choucroute ou des fromages comme le Langre et le Coulommiers.

Grand Cru Blanc de Blanc "mag 16"

Le vin :

Champagne issu du cépage Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru de la Côte des Blancs. Ce Champagne est aussi un assemblage d’années exprimé par le « mag 16». "16" correspond à l’année de récolte servant de base à l’assemblage, ici 2016. La mention « mag » signifie qu’une partie des vins de réserve ont été élevés en magnum, apportant précision et fraîcheur à cette cuvée.

La dégustation :

Le nez est à la fois floral avec quelques notes de fruits blancs et une pointe de fruits secs. La bouche est complexe avec une belle dominante d’agrumes évoluant sur une finale très longue.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 11°C à 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Riche "mag 14"

Le vin :

Champagne issu d’un assemblage des cépages Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru, Pinot Noir de Bisseuil Premier Cru et de Pinot Meunier de Damery.
Ce Champagne est aussi un assemblage d’années exprimé par le « mag 14». "14" correspond à l’année de récolte servant de base à l’assemblage, ici 2014. La mention « mag » signifie qu’une partie des vins de réserve a été élevée en magnum, apportant précision et fraîcheur à cette cuvée.

La dégustation :

Le nez est très expressif, ample. La bouche est gourmande sur de jolies notes de fruits rouges, une pointe de fruits secs et exotiques. La fin de bouche est franche et aérienne, relevée par une belle acidité très agréable. L’équilibre entre le vin et le dosage très intégré est surprenant par sa fraicheur.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 10°C à 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne régalera des mets épicés, comme la cuisine Thaï ou quelques plats japonais relevés. Il sublimera des fromages de caractère comme l’Epoisse ou la fourme d’Ambert. Il étonnera sur un poulet fermier à la peau très croustillante.

Brut Nature - Dosage Zéro "mag 16"

Le vin :

Champagne issu d’un assemblage des cépages Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru, Pinot Noir de Bisseuil Premier Cru et de Pinot Meunier de Damery.
Ce Champagne est aussi un assemblage d’années exprimé par le « mag 16». "16" correspond à l’année de récolte servant de base à l’assemblage, ici 2016. La mention « mag » signifie qu’une partie des vins de réserve a été élevée en magnum, apportant précision et fraîcheur à cette cuvée.

La dégustation :

Le nez est expressif de fruits rouges. La bouche est étonnamment gourmande, avec des notes de fruits blancs et de fruits secs. Puis la finale se fait précise et pure avec une belle pointe d’acidité et quelques notes d’amères rafraichissantes très agréables.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 10°C à 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

Ce Champagne est parfait en accompagnement des produits de la mer comme les huitres, les oursins, les langoustines et les crevettes grises. Il est idéal sur la cuisine japonaise précise et épurée comme ce vin.

Intense

Le vin :

Champagne issu d’un assemblage des cépages Chardonnay de Chouilly Grand Cru, Pinot Noir de Bisseuil Premier Cru et de Pinot Meunier de Damery.
Ce Champagne est aussi un assemblage d’années expliqué par la mention « mag » suivi d’un chiffre. Le chiffre correspond à l’année de récolte servant de base à l’assemblage. Le « mag » signifie qu’une partie des vins de réserve a été élevée en magnum, apportant précision et fraîcheur à cette cuvée.

La dégustation :

Le nez est expressif de fruits blancs avec quelques notes de fruits rouges. La bouche est ample et riche avec de jolies expressions d’agrumes. La fin de bouche est franche et claire avec une pointe de salinité qui met en appétit.
Température de dégustation conseillée : 10°C à 12°C

La verrerie :

Afin d’apprécier toute la richesse aromatique de ce vin de Champagne, il est recommandé de le servir dans une flute à la base ample de forme tulipe ou un simple verre à vin blanc.

Les accords :

La vinosité et la belle longueur en bouche de ce Champagne permettent de nombreux accords des plus simples aux plus raffinés. Il accompagnera parfaitement un pâté en croute de lapin, une assiette de tapas ou des fromages comme un Salers ou un comté affiné 18 mois.